Our Sri Lanka Tea Plantation Week: A Decisive Experience

We have just returned from a week in a small village near Neluwa in Sri Lanka . We stayed ”  at the inhabitant  ” as the saying goes, in other words in a charming and caring family who pampered us for a week.

More than a week in immersion, it was for us a week of disconnection and a realhymn to the slowness . Still, it made us a little afraid a priori. I explain all this in the article, but first of all I explain in a few sentences what brought us here and what we did.

Here is the family that received us (and supported) during this week.

Here is the family that received us (and supported) during this week.

“WHY DID THEY GO INTO THIS GALLEY?” “

It’s not very glorious, but that’s the question we asked ourselves the day we arrived in the village. The people seem very charming, but there is absolutely nothing to do. No wifi, the closest town is not within walking distance, no one really speaks English and we are probably condemned here to eat rice for a week and to get bored firm.

The tile. What happened in my head when I responded positively to Elina from the agency Duara Travels (see practical details at the bottom of the article) when she offered me to be “guinea pigs” new destination?

And why 7 days? And why not just 2-3 days, to “test” the concept, meet people and, basta, return to civilization by boasting of being gone off the marked trails (while stuffing a burger and a cool beer)? …

Eleanor and his 2 Sri Lankan tatas :)

Eleanor and its 2 Sri Lankan tatas 🙂

SCHEDULE OF OUR WEEK

In short, we spent 7 days in a family. Lost in the middle of “nothing”, do “nothing” to do. And finally … This “nothing” of appearance was not so empty.

The house where we spent a week.

The house where we spent a week.

We had hours to do nothing. To contemplate nature, people, animals. To marvel, to lose oneself in ordinary thoughts, to sleep awake. And I’ll tell you: it made us crazy.

And the nature is simply splendid !!

And the nature is simply splendid !!

We were also able to explore the surroundings : the tea plantations or the river where we went to refresh ourselves. We visited the tea factory (the manager, a very busy man, we were told, took 2 hours of his time to explain everything), we went to the Buddhist temple with the father of the family which we stayed and we were able to make a small trip to “the city” where we found a great playground for Eléanor .

Ballad in tea plantations

Ballad in tea plantations

In the temple with Dad, the English teacher (with whom I (Tony) discussed at length Buddhism), a monk (who did not want to return Eleanor) and Laetitia.

In the temple with Dad, an English teacher who spoke to us about Buddhism, a monk (who did not want to return Eleanor) and Laetitia.

And that’s all. Really ? Actually no. Our main activity was to meet, besides “our family”, the inhabitants of the village. We were thus received like princes in several dozens of houses with an immutable ritual: tea and biscuits.

Everywhere we have received an incredible welcome!

Everywhere we have received an incredible welcome!

As for Éléanor ( 1 year and 4 months ), I do not think I’m lying by saying that she was the darling of all the surroundings during this week. So much so that we sometimes wondered if people did not come to meet us or did not invite us to their homes  only to see this little blond baby with blue eyes ! In short, a pack of tatas and substitute tonsons and dozens of buddies of all ages.